RESOLVING THE CONSTITUTIONAL QUAGMIRE OF NON-JUSTICIABILITY OF FUNDAMENTAL OBJECTIVES OF STATE POLICE

RESOLVING THE CONSTITUTIONAL QUAGMIRE OF NON-JUSTICIABILITY OF FUNDAMENTAL OBJECTIVES OF STATE POLICE

Author by Dr. Eteete Michael Adam

Language: English

Abstract

Constitutional development and provisions in many countries of the world determine to a large extent, the thrust of socio-cultural and political advancements of such nation states. Law is in this respect viewed as an instrument of social engineering. Nigeria as a nation has grappled with several constitutional experimentations. From the Westminster cabinet style to the American style presidentialism, and several military interregnums in the political landscape, Nigeria has evolved a unique constitutional praxis. To what extent the constitutional development in Nigeria may have impacted on the socio-political life of the Nigerian state, if any, has formed the subject matter of scholarly discourse. The focus of this work is to particularly explore the legal confines of the constitutional provisions in chapter 2 of the Nigerian Constitution of 1999. To the undiscerning reader of the Constitution, there may be a feeling of satisfaction that the inclusion of the fundamental objectives and directive principles of state policy will assuredly translate to a socio-economic and political eldorado for the citizenry. But the self-same constitution has rendered these noble provisions non-justiciable. It is therefore the intendment of this work to assess the fundamental objectives and directive principles of state policy in the Nigerian Constitution and explore methods of reliance on the realms of international law as a way of enforcement of the objectives of state policy described as non-justiciable.


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