Aderibigbe, Titilayo. ‘Legal Implications of the 1999 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria in a Federalism’ in Olu Ajakaiye and Solomon A. Benjamin (editors) Issues in the Review of the 1999 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria,

Aderibigbe, Titilayo. ‘Legal Implications of the 1999 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria in a Federalism’ in Olu Ajakaiye and Solomon A. Benjamin (editors) Issues in the Review of the 1999 Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria,

Author by Dr. Titilayo Aderibigbe

Language: English

Abstract

The constitution of a country is-an affirmation of the way and manner a people wants to be governed. It should in effect be a reflection of their to-do-cultural, political and legal history and ways of life. A constitution may be written and rigid as in the United States of America or unwritten and flexible as in Great Britain. Its people should however show an unalloyed willingness to abide by its provisions and show true unfettered allegiance to it. Due to Nigeria's colonial heritage and multi-ethnic nature and memories of the civil war, the Nigerian constitutions have over the years, since independence in I960, tried to ensure that inter-ethnic suspicion and disunity is avoided. This explains why it became imperative that the preamble to the 1999 Constitution (as in other constitutions opens with): We the People of the Federal Republic of Nigeria: Having firmly and solemnly resolved: to live in unity and harmony as one indivisible and indissoluble sovereign nation under God dedicated to the promotion of inter-African solidarity, world peace, international co-operation and understanding: and to provide for a constitution for the purpose of promoting the good government and welfare of all persons in our country on the principles of freedom, equality and justice, and for the purpose of consolidating the unity of our people:


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