The prevalence, pattern and clinical presentation of developmental dental hard-tissue anomalies in children with primary and mix dentition from Ile-Ife, Nigeria

The prevalence, pattern and clinical presentation of developmental dental hard-tissue anomalies in children with primary and mix dentition from Ile-Ife, Nigeria

Author by Dr. Temilola Do

Journal/Publisher: Bmc Oral Health

Volume/Edition: 14

Language: English

Pages: 125 - 132

Abstract

 Background: The study of dental anomalies is important because it generates information that is important for

both the anthropological and clinical management of patients. The objective of this study is to determine the

prevalence and pattern of presentation of dental hard-tissue developmental anomalies in the mix dentition of

children residing in Ile-Ife, a suburban region of Nigeria.

 Methods: Information on age, sex and socioeconomic status was collected from 1,036 children aged four months

to 12 years through a household survey. Clinical examination was conducted to assess the presence of dental

anomalies. Associations between age, sex, socioeconomic status, prevalence, and pattern of presentation of the

developmental hard-tissue dental anomalies were determined.

 Result: Two hundred and seventy six (26.6%) children had dental anomalies. Of these, 23.8% had one anomaly, 2.5%

had two anomalies, and 0.3% had more than two anomalies. Of the children with anomalies, 49.3%were male, 50.7%

were female, and 47.8%, 28.6% and 23.6% were children from low, middle and high socioeconomic classes,

respectively. More anomalies were seen in permanent than primary dentition. Anomalies of tooth structure were most

prevalent (16.1%); anomalies which affect tooth number were least prevalent (1.3%). Dens evaginatus, peg-shaped

lateral, macrodontia, and talon cusp were more prevalent in the permanent dentition, and dens evaginatus peg-shaped

lateral and macrodontia were more prevalent in the maxilla. There were significantly more macrodontia anomalies in

males and in children of high socioeconomic status.

 Conclusion: This large survey of dental hard-tissue anomalies found in the primary dentition and mixed dentition of

children in Nigeria provides anthropological and clinical data that may aid the detection and management of dental

problems of children in Nigeria.


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