Moringa Plant Parts Consumption Had Effects on Reproductive Functions in Male And Female Rat Models

Moringa Plant Parts Consumption Had Effects on Reproductive Functions in Male And Female Rat Models

Author by Dr. Joshua Owolabi

Journal/Publisher: Iosr Journal Of Dental And Medical Sciences (iosr-jdms)

Volume/Edition: 16

Language: English

Pages: 82 - 86

Abstract

Moringa oleifera has become a very popular plant due to its widely acclaimed nutritional and phytomedicinal values. The leaves, seed, pods and flowers are consumed and used as ingredients and spices, while concoctions are also made from them. The leaves and flowers may also be consumed as vegetables. There are however, concerns about the effects of the various parts of the plant on fertility and reproduction. This aspect of the effects of Moringa oleifera phytochemistry has not been elaborately explored. There are findings that point to the possibility of antifertility effects of some of its parts. This research investigated the effects of the leaf, seed, flower, stem bark and root on reproductive functions of experimental animals. These are the parts of the plants that are typically used and consumed. In order to model human consumption of the plant parts; food formulas were prepared with the plant parts. Animals were divided into eleven groups labeled Groups 1-11. Groups 1 and 2 were given the high and low doses of the seed in the feed formula respectively; Groups 3 and 4 were given the high and low doses of the leaf in the feed formula respectively; Groups 5 and 6 were given the high and low doses of the flower in the feed formula respectively; Groups 7 and 8 were given the high and low doses of the root in the feed formula respectively; Groups 9 and 10 were given the high and low doses of the stem bark in the feed formula respectively while Group 11 served as the standard control and the animal were fed the normal chow. Experiment lasted 30 days and animals were thereafter sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Blood samples were collected, spermatozoa were collected from male animals and the testis in the male and uterus in the female were dissected and excised. Specific tests and analysis included packed cell volume [PCV (%)]; Sperm cell count (x106cells/ml), Sperm cell motility (%), Normal sperm cells (%), Abnormal sperm cells (%) to observe male reproductive functions; LH (mIU/ml), FSH (mIU/ml), Testosterone (ng/ml) to observe reproductive hormone functions and observation of the implantation sites to observe abortion probabilities. Results show that plant parts interfered with fertility functions to varying extents. It should be noted that the ingestion of certain moringa plant parts could interfere with fertility.


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