Emotional Intelligence Training and Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy effects on academic cheating: Implications for nationhood and national Consciousness in Nigeria.

Emotional Intelligence Training and Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy effects on academic cheating: Implications for nationhood and national Consciousness in Nigeria.

Author by Prof. Titi Hassan;

Journal/Publisher: Babcock University Journal Of Education (bujed)

Volume/Edition: 4

Language: English

Pages: 13 - 27

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of two notable cognitive behavioural therapies of Emotional Intelligence Training and Rational Emotive Therapy on the globally endemic act of academic cheating which has engulfed the entire educational institutions regardless of their affinity and rank. It further considers the implications of the study findings to nationhood and national consciousness. The study adopted the pre-test, post-test, quasi experimental research design of a 3 x 2 x 2 factorial matrix. This involved three levels of Rational Emotional Behaviour Therapy (REBT), Emotional Intelligence Training (EIT), and the Control Group; the two moderating variables  (gender and school - type,) which were determined at two levels of male and female and public and private respectively. A sample of 240 SS2 students was initially chosen from the population through the multistage process but this was subsequently reduced to 225 for data analysis due to attrition. Examination Reaction Scale (ERS) developed by Hassan (2004) was adopted for the study, to determine the potential for academic cheating among secondary school students in Ogun State, Nigeria.

  The finding showed a significant  effect of treatment on participants’ potential for academic cheating with REBT being a better strategy in reducing cheating tendency among secondary school students.  Also there was no significant effect of both school type and gender respectively on participants’ potential for academic cheating and neither was there a significant of three-way interaction effect of the treatment and gender and school type on potential for academic cheating.

Consequent upon these findings, it was recommended that educational planners should endeavour to introduce Rational Emotive Behaviour therapeutic techniques into secondary school curriculum and that they should utilize  these interventions to reduce or solve the problem of academic cheating among students.


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