Effects of Some Preservation Methods on the Nutrient and Mineral Compositions of Three Selected Edible Mushrooms

Effects of Some Preservation Methods on the Nutrient and Mineral Compositions of Three Selected Edible Mushrooms

Author by Dr. Ayandiran Aina

Journal/Publisher: Journal Of Microbial & Biochemical Technology

Volume/Edition: 10

Language: English

Pages: 106 - 111

Abstract

The global commercial mushroom production today is increasing yearly. To enhance the supply, many food
processing industries normally provide a wide range of canned and processed edible mushroom products such as
frozen, sterilized, dried, pickled, marinated and salted mushrooms in forms of mushroom powder, paste, concentrates
and extracts. This study was therefore aimed at investigating the effects of popular preservation methods on the
nutrient and mineral compositions of three selected oyster mushrooms of economic importance (Pleurotus ostreatus,
Pleurotus florida and Pleurotus sajor-caju). Fresh mushroom samples were purchased from mushroom farms; each
mushroom was shared into five different groups and processed as fresh, refrigerated, sundried, oven dried and
micro-wave dried groups, they were thereafter analyzed for nutrient and mineral compositions. The results obtained
revealed that the preservation method had significant effects on the nutrient and mineral compositions of the
mushroom samples. Notably, the lowest weight values were obtained from the sundried mushroom samples while
the highest value was obtained from the fresh samples. The microwave mushroom samples were richer in nutrient
and mineral compositions as compared to the other three preservation methods but in all lower than the fresh
samples. It is therefore concluded that the preservation methods had effects on the nutrient and mineral contents
of mushrooms. However, if there is need for preservation of excess mushrooms, preservation through micro-wave
drying is recommended best among the four processing methods for mushrooms preservation since it was able to
retain the highest value of protein in all the studied mushrooms.


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