Study on Bioremediation and Growth Curve Patterns of Bacteria Cultured in Hydrocarbon Formulated Media at Different Concentrations

Study on Bioremediation and Growth Curve Patterns of Bacteria Cultured in Hydrocarbon Formulated Media at Different Concentrations

Author by Dr. Ayandiran Aina

Journal/Publisher: International Journal Of Current Microbiology And Applied Sciences

Volume/Edition: 7

Language: English

Pages: 1 - 11

Abstract

Bioremediation, which employs the biosorption and or biodegradation potentials of
organisms or their attributes, is an effective technology that can be used to accomplish
both effective detoxification and volume reduction. Research was carried out to further
provide experimental evidences that support the use of biological method which is a better,
less expensive and safer means of biosorbing hydrocarbon contaminants. Bacteria isolated
from the African locust bean (Parkia biglobosa) effluent namely; Bacillus cereus, B.
subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acetobacter spp were used to biodegrade crude-oil
products such as petrol, kerosene and diesel oil at varying concentrations in a culture
medium. The pattern of microbial growth differs from organism to organism due to several
factors such as the incubation period, the nature and composition of the nutrient in which
the organism was cultured. Microbial load was between the range of 4.0-5.0 x 106 Cfu/ml
for B. cereus, B. subtilis, P. aeruginosa and Acetobacter spp when cultured in 0.2-0.4 ml
petrol concentration. Also, increase in the concentration of the hydrocarbon in the medium
from 0.2ml to 0.6ml led to a declination of cell density in all the four microbes
investigated. This work established the fact that B. cereus proved to be a better
hydrocarbon degrader as compared to the other bacteria isolates used in this study in this
order: B. cereus > B. subtilis > P. aeruginosa > Acetobacter spp. In conclusion, this work
revealed that Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acetobacter
species isolated from effluent collected from production site of fermented African locust
beans condiment are able to utilize hydrocarbon compounds as their carbon source,
thereby proving their biodegradability potentials.


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