Nutritional Status of Adolescents Fed Lacto-Ovo and Non-Vegetarian Diets in Babcock University High School and Isanbi Comprehensive High School,Ilishan-Remo Ogun State

Nutritional Status of Adolescents Fed Lacto-Ovo and Non-Vegetarian Diets in Babcock University High School and Isanbi Comprehensive High School,Ilishan-Remo Ogun State

Author by Dr. Ime Ani

Journal/Publisher: International Journal Of Scientific And Engineering Research.

Volume/Edition: 10

Language: English

Pages: 910 - 918

Abstract

Adolescent is the transition period between childhood and adulthood, a window of opportunity for the improvement of nutritional status and correcting poor nutritional practices. Lacto-ovo vegetarians are allowed the consumption of milk and egg. The aim of this study was to assess the nutritional status of adolescents fed lacto-ovo vegetarian and non-vegetarian diets in both private and public schools. The population used was 200 students. A semi structured questionnaire was used to obtain information regarding socio-demographic characteristics of the respondents, anthropometric data, dietary pattern and nutrient intake (24hour dietary recall). Descriptive and inferential statistics were used and statistical tools which included, Total Dietary Assessment (TDA), WHO Anthroplus (2006), and SPSS Version20.0, to analyze the data. 98% of the vegetarian and 89% of the non-vegetarian were between the ages of 14-16 years and (2%) of the vegetarian and (11%) of the non-vegetarian were between the ages of 17-19 years. From the anthropometric data, (84%) of the vegetarian and (86%) of the non-vegetarian were normal, (12%) and (10%) of the vegetarian and non-vegetarian respectively were overweight, (4%) and (1%) of the vegetarian and non-vegetarian were obese and 3% of the non-vegetarian were underweight. About two-third of the respondents (66.5%) ate three times in a day, (18.5%) ate 2-3 times in a day, (9.5%) ate more than three times in a day, while just 5.5% ate twice in a day respectively. 99% of the vegetarians had a fixed timing of meals as contrary to their non-vegetarian counterparts that had varied timing of meals (52%) fixed and 43% respectively. There was no difference in the nutrients intake (carbohydrates, protein, fat, calcium, iron, zinc and vitamin B12) of lacto-ovo vegetarian and non-vegetarian respondents, except for energy, in which the lacto-ovo vegetarian had a higher intake, there was no significant difference in the anthropometric status of adolescents fed lacto-ovo vegetarian and non-vegetarian diets.


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