Career preferences among final year medical students and house officers: A multicentre survey in Southwest Nigeria

Career preferences among final year medical students and house officers: A multicentre survey in Southwest Nigeria

Author by Dr. Akolade Idowu

Journal/Publisher: Res. J. Of Health Sci.

Volume/Edition: 8

Language: English

Pages: 36 - 44

Abstract

Objective: Career preferences of medical trainees have the potential to shape the future of the healthcare 
workforce  of  any  nation.  This  study  aimed  to  determine  the  factors  that  influence  career  choices  of 
medical students and house officers (interns) in two institutions located in Southwest Nigeria. 
Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out amongst final year medical students and interns in two 
medical universities and their corresponding teaching hospitals in Southwest Nigeria. A questionnaire 
was  used  to  obtain  socio-demographic  data,  career  choices,  reasons  behind  career  choices  and  the 
presence and influence of mentorship on career choices. Responses were analyzed using the Statistical 
Package for Social Sciences Version 21, and descriptive statistics generated. 
Results: Obstetrics & Gynecology and Surgical specialties were the most preferred career choices by the 
medical students, while Surgical and Medical specialties were most preferred by the interns. Personal 
interest and other personal reasons were the top motivating factors for the career choices amongst the 
medical students of both institutions, while personal interest and future job opportunities were the top 
reasons for the career choices amongst the interns of both institutions.  Mentorship was lacking for most of 
the medical students and house officers, except in one of the teaching hospitals, where over half of the 
interns had career mentors. 
Conclusion: Attention should be paid to the reasons behind career choices, in order to channel efforts 
towards making clinical specialties become attractive to young medical trainees, as the future of the health 
workforce in the nation depends on it.


Other Co-Authors