Tuberculosis Medication Adherence among TB-HIV Co-infected Persons undergoing Concomitant Treatment in Selected Local Governments in a North Central State in Nigeria

Tuberculosis Medication Adherence among TB-HIV Co-infected Persons undergoing Concomitant Treatment in Selected Local Governments in a North Central State in Nigeria

Author by Boluwatife C. Ogunjimi

Journal/Publisher: Texila International Journal Of Public Health

Volume/Edition: 8

Language: English

Pages: 1 - 9

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate Tuberculosis medication adherence among patients undergoing concomitant treatment for HIV and TB in selected Local Government Areas of Benue State, Nigeria. The study adopts a cross-sectional descriptive survey design using a quantitative instrument to generate information on factors that have significant influence on TB medication adherence among persons using concurrent TB-HIV medication. The overall rate of adherence was 72.7%. Perception of TB disease and TB medication, Family and peer support, Health Service factors, Media and Policy were positively and significantly associated with adherence practice among participants in the study. The study revealed a high prevalence of knowledge (96%) (9.6±0.86) about TB disease among respondents, although knowledge had no significant association with TB medication adherence among the study group. In relation to the sociodemographic characteristics of respondents, analysis of age, gender and level of education did not reveal any significant association with medication adherence and likewise marital status or living arrangement. The study concluded that factors associated with adherence TB medication adherence among persons undergoing concomitant treatment are factors that could be modified with concerted efforts and strategies by stakeholders and health programs to improve adherence levels and cause a decline in the level of non-adherence (27.3%) reported in the study. The study recommends further studies to assess factors that could provide evidence for interventions to help persons suffering from comorbidities like TB and HIV.


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