Biochemical and histomorphological changes in testosterone propionate-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in male Wistar rats treated with ketogenic diet

Biochemical and histomorphological changes in testosterone propionate-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in male Wistar rats treated with ketogenic diet

Author by Dr. Abolanle Kayode

Journal/Publisher: Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy

Volume/Edition: 132

Language: English

Pages: 1 - 7

Abstract

Purpose: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a urological disease characterized by proliferation of the stromal and epithelial cells of the prostate of older men. Ketogenic diet (KD) is a high fat, moderate protein and low carbohydrate diet which acts on metabolic systems through hormonal modulation and simulation amongst other mechanisms. This study investigated the effect of KD consumption in Testosterone Propionate (TP) induced BPH. Materials and methods: Twenty-Five male rats were divided into five groups of five animals each; control and KD group were administered distilled water and KD respectively, while the remaining groups were given 30 mg/kg body weight of TP subcutaneously once daily for 28 days. Thereafter, the three groups, TP, TP + Finasteride, TP + KD were administered standard rat chow, finasteride (0.1 mg/kg) and KD respectively, for 42 days prior to sacrificing the rats and their serum and prostate glands obtained for analysis. Results: Triglyceride, Total cholesterol, HMG CoA reductase, Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Luteinizing Hormones, Testosterone, Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) concentration and Malondialdehyde levels were significantly increased (p ? 0.05) while superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly (p ? 0.05) reduced in the TP group. These changes were reversed significantly (p ? 0.05) in the finasteride and KD treatment groups. The diet also caused significant (p ? 0.05) decrease in prostate weight and stromal glandular tissue. Conclusion: This study suggests that ketogenic diet consumption ameliorated prostatic hyperplasia in the rats and may be considered as an affordable and non-invasive management option for benign prostatic hyperplasia in men.


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