From Visual Aesthetics to Experiential Aesthetics: The Use of Musical Iconography among Private Secondary Schools in South-West, Nigeria

From Visual Aesthetics to Experiential Aesthetics: The Use of Musical Iconography among Private Secondary Schools in South-West, Nigeria

Author by Dr. Olusegun Ojuola

Journal/Publisher: Contemporary Humanities Journal,

Volume/Edition: 12

Language: English

Pages: 84 - 96

Abstract

Many private secondary schools in Nigeria subscribe to the use of musical iconography for its unique aesthetics, and as part of their advertisement displays, especially on the school’s calendars, yearbooks, magazines, and mass media advertisements. However, it is quite alarming and worrisome that just a few of the schools that subscribes to the use of musical iconography have actually gone beyond its use as mere visual aesthetics to the level of experiential aesthetics within the classroom where there is teaching and learning of music, both in theory and performance. It is against this backdrop that this study seeks to examine the extent to which what is advertised is actually practiced within the private secondary school system, and how it aptly represents the socio-cultural diversities of Nigeria. This is necessary because of the misleading influence on the prospective candidates and their sponsors who become short-changed in the process. The study adopts descriptive survey research design incorporating key informant interviews with administrators of selected secondary schools. The collected data are content analyzed. The findings revealed there is common practice of engaging musical iconographic objects as part of some secondary schools’ advertisement displays without a concomitant effective teaching and learning of music in many of such schools. Also, there is an observed non-inclusion of indigenous musical contents and materials as part of the schools’ iconographic objects. The study therefore recommends that music should be made compulsory at all Levels of education and should transcend mere visual aesthetics to experiential aesthetics within the classroom with qualified music teachers operating on Full-time basis. Also, the teaching and learning of Nigerian indigenous musical instruments should be incorporated in the schools’ music programme.


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