Mitigation strategies in early phase of COVID-19 pandemic and recovery potential in Nigeria and United States

Mitigation strategies in early phase of COVID-19 pandemic and recovery potential in Nigeria and United States

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Journal/Publisher: Afr. J. Med. Med. Sci.

Volume/Edition: 50

Language: English

Pages: 227 - 235

Abstract

In response to the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, much uncertainty exists in low- and middle-income countries like Nigeria about the effects of different mitigation strategies on the trajectory and impact of the disease transmission given how high-income countries like the United States (US) with even better infrastructures have been impacted. Further uncertainty stems particularly from the significant challenges in a country’s health system, economy and food security prior to the emergence of the pandemic. The objective of this study was to compare the physical and psychosocial mitigation strategies during early phase of COVID-19 pandemic and recovery potential in Nigeria and US. Methods: We performed a secondary data review of relevant studies and reports searched on PubMed, Google Scholar and Google databases. Data were analyzed using content analysis and grounded theory methods. Results: We showed that the implementation of biomedical mitigation strategies during COVID-19 pandemic lockdown without physical and psychosocial mitigation strategies such as food supply and financial incentive puts Nigeria at risk of further crises while the US, though on the path of a longterm recovery, faced similar risk as well from protests despite availability of food and financial supports. Conclusion: The lack of food supply and financial incentive during COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in Nigeria, and associated negative impact on recovery highlight the need for provision of social welfare packages for its citizens to mitigate the physical and psychosocial effects of the COVID-19 pandemic (e.g. violence). Evidence of protests in the US warrants intensified risk communication interventions.


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