PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS OF BODY MEASUREMENTS IN TWO GENOTYPES OF CHICKENS FED GRADED LEVELS OF Moringa oleifera SEED MEAL

PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS OF BODY MEASUREMENTS IN TWO GENOTYPES OF CHICKENS FED GRADED LEVELS OF Moringa oleifera SEED MEAL

Author by Dr. Adeyinka Akintunde

Journal/Publisher: Journal Of Animal Production Research

Volume/Edition: 33

Language: English

Pages: 1 - 13

Abstract

This study was conducted to explore the interrelationship among body measurements in two genotypes of chickens (Yoruba ecotype chickens and Marshall broiler chickens) fed graded levels of Moringa oleifera seed meal (MOSM) using principal component analysis with the view of identifying those components that drive body conformation in local and exotic chickens. A total of 192 birds were used, 96 birds per genotype. The parameters measured at 8 weeks of age were body weight, thigh length, wing length, shank length, body length, keel length and body girth. Principal component analysis with variance maximizing orthogonal rotation was used to extract the components. Six principal components were extracted when all the birds were considered irrespective of genotypes which explained 84.153% of the total variation in the original. Twelve principal components each were extracted for Yoruba Ecotype Chickens (YEC) and Marshall broiler chickens accounting for 85.029% and 82.523% of the total variance respectively. Generally, PC1 had the largest share of the total variance and correlated highly with body weight, thigh length, body girth, wing length, thigh length, shank length and body length. PC1 was termed the generalized form of broilers as it loaded heavily on body weight at weeks 4 and 8 while it loaded heavily on thigh length at weeks 4 and 8 for YEC. PC2 had its loadings in Marshall broilers on thigh length at week 8 while it loaded on body girth at weeks 4 and 8 for YEC while PC3 had positive loading on keel length at week 8 for YEC. The diet significantly influenced the performance of the birds per genotype as the responses were different to the diet hence the divergence of the genotype from each other despite the utilization of the same feed ingredients. These components could be used as selection criteria for improving body size of Marshall broilers and YEC as well as in determining feed utilization and response of Marshall broilers and YEC.


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